Sports Coach Logo Sports Coach Logo

            topics

 

text Translator

 

 

site search facility

 


 

 


 

VO2 max from Nonexercise Data

This calculation of VO2 max using non-exercise data (George 1997)[1] can provide a useful initial estimate of an athlete's Vo2max. The data required to predict an athlete's VO2 max is Gender, Weight, Height, Physical Activity Rating and Perceived Functional Ability for one and three miles.

Required Resources

  • Pen and Paper
  • Weighing Scales
  • Tape measure
  • Assistant

How to conduct the test

  • Assistant  to measure and record the athlete's  weight (kg) and height (metres)
Gender   Weight in Kilograms Kilograms  

Height in Metres Metres

  • Athlete to complete the “Physical Activity Rating” assessment, the “Perceived Functional Ability for 1 mile” assessment and the “Perceived Functional Ability for 3 miles” assessment (see below)

Physical Activity Rating

In the following table please select the appropriate "radio button" that indicates the overall physical activity in the past six months.

Inactive: avoid walking or exertion
Light activity: walk for pleasure
Moderate activity: 10 to 60 minutes/week of moderate activity
Moderate activity: over 1 hour/week of moderate activity
Vigorous activity: spend less than 30 minutes/week in an activity such as running, swimming, rowing
Vigorous activity: spend 30 to 60 minutes/week in physical activity
Vigorous activity: run 5 to 10 miles/week or spend 1 to 3 hours/week in physical activity
Vigorous activity: run 10 to 15 miles/week or spend 3 to 6 hours/ week in physical activity
Vigorous activity: run 15 to 20 miles/week or spend 6 to 7 hours/week in physical activity
Vigorous activity: run 20 to 25 miles/week or spend 7 to 8 hours/week in physical activity
Vigorous activity: run over 25 miles/week or spend over 8 hours/week in physical activity

Perceived Functional Ability

In the following table please select the appropriate "radio button" that indicates your perceived ability to complete one mile without becoming breathless or over fatigued.

Walk at 18 minute/mile pace or more
Walk at 17 minute/mile pace
Walk at 16 minute/mile pace
Walk at 15 minute/mile pace
Walk at 14 minute/mile pace
Walk at 13 minute/mile pace
Jog at 12 minute/mile pace
Jog at 11 minute/mile pace
Jog at 10 minute/mile pace
Jog at 9 minute/mile pace
Jog at 8 minute/mile pace
Run at 7 minute/mile pace
Run at less than 7 minute/mile pace

In the following table please select the appropriate "radio button" that indicates your perceived ability to complete three miles without becoming breathless or over fatigued.

I could walk the 3 miles at 18 minute/mile pace or more
I could walk the 3 miles at 17 minute/mile pace
I could walk the 3 miles at 16 minute/mile pace
I could walk the 3 miles at 15 minute/mile pace
I could walk the 3 miles at 14 minute/mile pace
I could walk the 3 miles at 13 minute/mile pace
I could jog the 3 miles at 12 minute/mile pace
I could jog the 3 miles at 11 minute/mile pace
I could jog the 3 miles at 10 minute/mile pace
I could jog the 3 miles at 9 minute/mile pace
I could jog the 3 miles at 8 minute/mile pace
I could run the 3 miles at 7 minute/mile pace
I could run the 3 miles at less than 7 minute/mile pace

Assessment

Select the "Analyse" Button to obtain and estimate of the athlete's VO2 max. The test can be repeated by selecting the "Reset" button.

Your estimated VO2 max is : ml/kg/min

The standard error of VO2 max = ± 3.44 ml/kg/min (George 1997)[1]

Analysis

Analysis of the test result is by comparing it with the athlete's previous results for this test. It is expected that, with appropriate training between each test, the analysis would indicate an improvement in the athlete's VO2 max.

Target Group

This test is suitable for endurance athletes and players of endurance sports (e.g. football, rugby) but not for individuals where the test would be contraindicated. The test result will be most accurate for athletes aged 18 to 29, but older athletes can still use this test to monitor gains in fitness and obtain an estimate for their VO2 max.

Reliability

Test reliability refers to the degree to which a test is consistent and stable in measuring what it is intended to measure. Reliability will depend upon how strict the test is conducted and the individual's level of motivation to perform the test. The following link provides a variety of factors that may influence the results and therefore the test reliability.

Validity

Test validity refers to the degree to which the test actually measures what it claims to measure and the extent to which inferences, conclusions, and decisions made on the basis of test scores are appropriate and meaningful. This test provides a means to monitor the effect of training on the athlete's physical development. For an assessment of your VO2 max see the VO2 max normative data tables.

Advantages

  • No equipment required
  • Simple to set up and conduct
  • More than one athlete can conduct the test at the same time
  • Can be conducted almost anywhere

Disadvantages

  • Assistant required to administer the test


References

  1. GEORGE, J. D. et al. (1997) Nonexercise VO2 max estimation for physically active college students. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., 29, p.415

Related References

The following references provide additional information on this topic:

  • WEBB, C. et al. (2014) Estimating VO2max Using a Personalized Step Test. Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science, 18 (3), p. 184-197
  • SULLIVAN, K. et al. (2014) Aerobic Fitness Levels and Validation of a Non Exercise VO 2max Prediction Equation for HIV-Infected Patients on HAART. HIV clinical trials, 15 (2), p. 69-77
  • REXHEPI, A. M. and BRESTOVCI, B. (2014) Prediction of vo2max based on age, body mass, and resting heart rate. Human Movement, 15 (1), p. 56-59

Page Reference

If you quote information from this page in your work then the reference for this page is:

  • MACKENZIE, B. (2001) VO2 max from Nonexercise Data [WWW] Available from: https://www.brianmac.co.uk/vo2maxnd.htm [Accessed

Related Pages

The following Sports Coach pages provide additional information on this topic: