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Talent Evaluation

Studies conducted at Indiana University USA (not published) revealed that it is possible to accurately predict performance in selected track and field events using relatively simple tests.

Objectives

To assist coaches recognise the potential of young athletes and predict their performance in selected track and field events. All of the performance tests and calculations are detailed in Rogers (2000)[1]. The following are the basic tests and calculations.

Tests

The basic tests are undertaken in the order given:

  • Male Athletes - Standing long jump, vertical jump, five bounds and standing 30 metres
  • Female Athletes - Weight, standing long jump, stride length and stride frequency

Standing Long Jump (Male & Female)

The athlete places their feet over the edge of the sandpit. The athlete crouches, leans forward, swings their arms backwards, the jumps horizontally as far as possible, jumping with both feet into the sandpit. The coach should measure from the edge of the sandpit to the nearest point of contact. The start of the jump must be from a static position. Two trials are performed and the best performance used in the calculations. Result to be in metres.

Vertical Jump (Male)

The athlete chalks the end of his finger tips stands side onto the wall, keeping both feet remaining on the ground, reaches up as high as possible with one hand and marks the wall with the tips of the fingers (M1). From a static position the athlete jumps as high as possible and marks the wall with the chalk on his finger tips (M2) The coach then measures the distance from M1 to M2. Two trials are performed and the best performance used in the calculations. Result to be in metres.

Five Bounds for Distance (Male)

From a stationary position with both feet together the athlete executes 4 bounds and a jump into the sandpit. Measurement is made from the start point to the landing point nearest to the starting line. Two trials are performed and the best performance used in the calculations. Result to be in metres.

Standing 30 metres (Male)

From a standing start the athlete runs 30 metres. Two trials are performed and the fastest time is used in the calculations. Result to be in seconds.

Stride Frequency (Female)

From a standing start the athlete runs 60 metres. The time is recorded for athlete to compete 30 metres and 60 metres. The number of strides taken from 30 metres to 60 metres is recorded. The number of strides is divided by the time for the last 30 metres (60 metres time minus the 30 metres time) to give stride frequency. Result to be strides/second.

Stride Length (Female)

From a standing start the athlete runs 60 metres. The number of strides taken from 30 metres to 60 metres is recorded. The number of strides is divided by 30 to give stride length. Result to be in metres.

Weight (Female)

Wearing running clothes, not shoes, measure the athlete's weight. Result to be in pounds.

Male

Enter the test results and then select the "Calculate" button for an analysis.

Vertical Jump metres
Standing Long Jump metres
Five Bounds metres
Standing 30 metres seconds
points
90% confidence level to points

Analysis

The IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events (edition 2001) are used to estimate performance in a selected event. On the appropriate male event table locate the number of points and read off the distance or time. The 90% confidence levels for each event are detailed below.

100 metres to seconds
200 metres to seconds
400 metres to seconds
1500 metres to seconds
110 metres Hurdles to seconds
High Jump to metres
Pole Vault to metres
Long Jump to metres
Shot to metres
Discus to metres
Javelin to metres

Female

Enter the event results and then select the "Calculate" button for an analysis of the results.

Weight pounds (lbs)
Standing Long Jump metres
Stride Length metres
Stride Frequency strides/second
points
90% confidence level to points

Analysis

The IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events (edition 2001) are used to estimate performance in a selected event. On the appropriate female event table locate the number of points and read off the distance or time. The 90% confidence levels for each event are detailed below.

100 metres to seconds
200 metres to seconds
400 metres to seconds
800 metres to seconds
1500 metres to seconds
100 metres Hurdles to seconds
High Jump to metres
Pole Vault to metres
Long Jump to metres
Shot to metres
Discus to metres
Javelin to metres

Free Calculator

  • Talent Calculator - a free Microsoft Excel spreadsheet that you can download and use on your computer.


References

  1. ROGERS, L. (2000) USA Track and Field Coaching Manual. Leeds: Human Kinetics

Related References

The following references provide additional information on this topic:

  • LI, J. H. et al. (2013) A comparison of metabolomical and traditional biochemical methods used for athletic talent identification. Journal of Physical Education, 1, 028
  • HOLT, N. L. and MITCHELL, T. (2006) Talent development in English professional soccer. International Journal of Sport Psychology, 37, p. 77-98
  • ABBOTT, A. et al. (2002) Talent identification and development: An academic review Report for Sportscotland by Edinburgh University

Page Reference

If you quote information from this page in your work then the reference for this page is:

  • MACKENZIE, B. (2003) Talent Evaluation [WWW] Available from: https://www.brianmac.co.uk/talent.htm [Accessed

Related Pages

The following Sports Coach pages provide additional information on this topic: